Your State's Worst Allergy Season

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Your State's Worst Allergy Season

When are people griping about allergies?

Woman suffering from allergies

Your State-By-State Guide to the Worst Seasonal Allergies

Gesundheit! Are you accustomed to sneezing your head off during certain times of year? You’re not alone. Over 50 million Americans react to nasal allergens like pollen, mold, grass, pets, and more. In fact, nasal allergies affect 30 percent of adults and 40 percent of kids. Depending on where you live, you might suffer more during certain seasons due to pollen blooms and blossoming plants. To get ahead of your allergies or diagnose your symptoms, check out our state-by-state guide to America’s worst seasonal allergies.

Your State's Worst Allergy Season




Your State's Second Worst Allergy Season




Your State's Third Worst Allergy Season



Our Methodology:

To determine the worst season for allergies in each state, we analyzed Google trends data from 2012–2017. Then, we determined which allergies had the highest search volume. That not only told us when the majority of people were experiencing allergies, but which season is worst for allergies in each state.

Interesting Allergy Findings

  • Nationwide, spring is the worst allergy season. From March to May, 42 states had the highest search traffic for allergy information compared to any other season. Summer is the second worst season for allergies based on our study.
  • Across all 50 states, October has the lowest allergen search traffic. This leads us to believe that the fewest amount of people suffer allergies in October, which is surprising given the falling leaves, fall flora, and mold.
  • February is the worst month for winter allergies, particularly toward the end of the month when plants start blooming once again.

The Worst Allergens Per Region

Commiserate with people in your area of the country by learning which plants cause the most allergies in your neck of the woods.
Northeastern U.S.

  • Ragweed
  • Mulberry
  • Elm
  • Maple
  • Ryegrass
  • Sagebrush
  • Oak
  • Russian Thistle
Central U.S.

  • Ragweed
  • Mulberry
  • Elm
  • Maple
  • Sagebrush
  • Ryegrass
  • Oak
  • Russian Thistle
Western U.S.

  • Ragweed
  • Elm
  • Maple
  • Ryegrass
  • Sagebrush
  • Oak
  • Arizona Cypress
  • Russian Thistle
Southeastern U.S.

  • Pecan
  • Oak
  • Ragweed
  • Mountain Cedar
  • Elm
  • Maple
  • Ryegrass
  • Sagebrush
  • Russian Thistle

Solutions for Allergy Relief

You can’t help it if your immune system goes overboard when it comes into contact with certain plants. What you can do something about is how you handle your allergies. The following advice will help you get much-needed allergy relief and once again live in harmony with nature.


Antihistamines

Antihistamine is a fancy word for allergy-blocking medicine. Antihistamines include allergy eye drops, nasal sprays, and oral medication like Zyrtec and Claritin. While you’ll need to administer or take antihistamines daily—and often hourly—they will provide you with temporary allergy relief.


Allergy Shots

If you have severe seasonal pollen allergies, consider allergy shots. While getting pricked with a needle isn’t pleasant, allergy shots (a type of immunotherapy) builds up your body’s tolerance to what drives your sinuses crazy. Often times people need months or years worth of allergy shots to become “immune” to allergens, but with regular upkeep you should feel much better during allergy season.


Saline Spray

Saline sprays calm your sinuses by lessening inflammation and keeping your nasal passages moist. Saline nasal sprays only cost a few bucks at the local drug store and may be able to curb your pollen allergies before they spiral out of control.


Local Honey

Some people say that eating a spoonful of local honey every day helps with pollen allergies by building up your tolerance—much like allergy shots. The only catch is you have to eat raw honey that’s collected within five miles of your home, since that’s the pollen you’ll most likely encounter. Consider starting your own honeybee hive in the back yard to harvest your own natural allergy-reducing medicine and help the environment while you’re at it!


Herbs

People have relied on herbs as a form of medicine for thousands of years. Kind of funny that while some plants cause you to sneeze and itch others help those symptoms subside. If you’d like to make your own tinctures out of plants and herbs to treat your seasonal allergies, here are some recipes.


Air Purifier

Allergies don’t only loom outdoors; they lurk in your home too. If none of the options above work for you, we (of course) recommend you try to purify your air with the help of an allergy-reducing air purifier. When your windows are shut, some of our devices can purify 1,100 square feet worth of air—making air purifiers ideal for your bedroom (where you spend almost half of your day) or in an active part of your home. Start breathing better when you bring home an air purifier to combat your worst seasonal allergies.


Millions of people across the globe suffer seasonal allergies. We hope this article helped clear the air on what you might be allergic to during each season and taught you a few ways to alleviate your allergies. Learn more about air purifiers for allergies.